Archive for the 'events' Category

The City and the Ocean

Posted by on Nov 06 2013 | events

The City and the Ocean

DATE: Wednesday, November 6, 2013
TIME: 6:00 pm
LOCATION: Exploratorium Bay Observatory Pier 15 at Embarcadero and Green Street map
REGISTRATION: Please register with eventbrite
SUGGESTED DONATION: $10-$20
TRANSIT: The Exploratorium is served by the F streetcar as well as many MUNI buses and rail lines. The Embarcadero BART station is a 10 mintute walk away. Outdoor bike parking is available next to the museum.

Although “greening” our cities has been the focus of much of the sustainable cities movement, we often overlook the health of the rivers, bays, oceans and shorelines that are a part of our urban landscapes. As cities attempt to adapt to rising tides, amplified by climate change, how do we reflect on the urbanization of our waterways, their history and the ways they have been altered. How do we design for sea level rise; conserve or enhance the biodiversity of our bays, oceans and rivers; and begin to understand our shorelines as an integrated part of the ecology of more biodiverse cities?

Join us for a discussion with Tim Beatley, the author of Biophilic Cities: Integrating Nature into Urban Design and Planning and the forthcoming book Blue Urbanism (Island Press); Eric Sanderson, Senior Conservation Ecologist at the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the author of the best-selling book, Mannahatta: A Natural History of New York City (Abrams); Robin Grossinger, a Senior Scientist at the San Francisco Estuary Institute; and John Gillis, author of The Human Shore: Seacoasts in History (University of Chicago Press). From the perspectives of ecology, history, and sustainable planning the panel will explore past and future perspectives on ways to foster a harmonious relationship between cities and our waterways.

This program is co-presented with the Exploratorium Bay Observatory and is part of the San Francisco Biodiversity Summit hosted by the Seed Fund and the San Francisco Department of the Environment.

Photo: Detail of 1859 U.S Coastal Survey Map, courtesy of David Rumsey Map Collection

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Freeways Without Futures

Posted by on Sep 19 2013 | events

Freeways Without Futures

DATE: September 19, 2013
TIME:
7:00 pm
LOCATION: 917 Bryant Street, San Francisco
REGISTRATION: Please register with eventbrite
SUGGESTED DONATION: $5-$15
TRANSIT: Served by Market Street transit lines to Civic Center or MUNI lines 19, 27 and 47 to SOMA. Secure bike parking available.

Throughout the 20th Century elevated freeways were created in many American cities. They cut huge swaths across our urban landscapes, devastating the fabric of neighborhoods, strained the connection to our rivers and bays, and polluting our cities. Now, many of these highways are being torn down. In Seoul, South Korea Cheonggyecheon Stream, now daylighted, occupies what was once an elevated highway. In Portland, Oregon Harbor Drive was removed, creating a waterfront park along the Willamette River. In San Francisco, the Embarcadero and Central Freeways have been removed to create the Embarcadero and Octavia Boulevards. The removal of these freeways has reconnected San Francisco’s waterfront, enabling the renovation of the ferry building and piers supporting cultural organizations like the Exploratorium. Octavia Boulevard has been re-imagined both temporarily and permanently; supporting Envelope A+D’s Proxy project, Hayes Valley Farm, a thriving public art program as well as the long-term vision of the Market and Octavia Neighborhood Plan.

San Francisco now has another opportunity to take down a freeway while creating major trans- portation infrastructure improvements in an important area of the city. Currently, the stub end of Interstate 280 creates a barrier between the developing Mission Bay neighborhood and Potrero Hill. At the same time, the Caltrain railyard — 19 acres stretching from Fourth Street to Seventh Street between King and Townsend — forms a barrier between Mission Bay and SoMa. The obstruction will only get worse if current plans for high-speed rail proceed, forcing 16th Street and Mission Bay Boulevard into depressed trenches beneath the tracks and the elevated freeway.

The Studio for Urban Projects invites you to join us for a panel discussion re-imagining San Francisco without the 280 freeway. Our speakers will include Gillian Gillett, Mayor Ed Lee’s transporation policy director and the champion of the current effort to tear down portion of I-280; John Norquist, currently the President and CEO of the Congress for the New Urbanism where he advocates for city planing efforts to replace freeways with boulevards and the former Mayor of Milwaukee where he received widespread recognition for removing a .8 mile stretch of elevated freeway; and Douglas Burnham, the Principal and Founder of Envelope A+D, architects that designed Proxy along Octavia Boulevard. The evening’s panel will be moderated by Tomiquia Moss, the Community Planning Policy Director for the urban planning and policy think tank SPUR.

This program is presented in collaboration with the AIA San Francisco as part of the Architecture and the City Festival. It is held in conjunction with the Center for Architecture and Design competition “Reimagine. Reconnect. Restore. What if 280 came down?.” John Norquist’s participation is generously supported by the Seed Fund.

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Tigers on Market Street

Posted by on Sep 08 2013 | events

Tigers on Market Street

DATE: September 8, 2013
TIME
: 11:00 am-2:00 pm
LOCATION: Embarcadero in front of the Ferry Building
REGISTRATION: Please register with Eventbrite
SUGGESTED DONATION: $10-$20
TRANSIT: Served by BART (Embarcadero station) and all MUNI lines. On-street bike parking available.

Market Street may seem like an unlikely habitat for butterflies but the corridor of London Plane trees, canyon of tall buildings, and sources for water from urban fountains have created an unplanned riparian area that has become the home of Western Tiger Swallowtails. First noted by lepidopterist Harriet Reinhard in 1987, this phenomenon is an incredible story of wildlife adaptation within the heart of the city.

While the ecological footprint of cities is widely studied, we often overlook the efficacy of the collective ecosystem of our open spaces, shorelines, parks, and street plantings. What can we do to perpetuate and enhance nature’s presence in the city? How can we redesign Market Street to include habitat for the Swallowtail and other wildlife? How can better understanding this phenomenon help us to design our cities differently?

For the last two years, Amber Hasselbring and Liam O’brien have studied the Western Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly on Market Street. Hasselbring is a San Francisco-based artist, naturalist and the Director of Nature in the City while Liam O’brien is an illustrator, lepidopterist and conservationist. Together, they are working to find ways in which to support and expand Market Street as a habitat to this extraordinary butterfly. We invite you to join us on a walking tour with Amber and Liam exploring Market Street through the perspective of the swallowtail, helping to document this natural phenomenon and expand it. Please bring your camera.

Photo: Market Street River, collage, courtesy of Liam O’Brien

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Urban Refuge

Posted by on May 08 2013 | events

Urban Refuge

TIME : 7:00 pm
LOCATION: Studio for Urban Projects, 917 Bryant Street, San Francisco, CA 94103
REGISTRATION: Please RSVP to info@studioforurbanprojects.org. Suggested donation $5-$15
TRANSIT: Served by Market Street transit lines to Civic Center or MUNI lines 19, 27 and 47 to SOMA. Secure bike parking available.

Nature can often seem remote within our everyday urban lives, however our cities provide habitat to many wild animals, insects and amphibians that have adapted to even the most hostile of urban environments. Our urban landscape is inhabited by pigeons, hawks, crows, deer, bees, butterflies, raccoons, frogs and even coyotes. How can we encourage habitat, acknowledging that our streets, buildings, backyards and parks are a shared landscape between humans and wildlife?

Join us for a conversation exploring the potential of the urban refuge with Tim Beatley, the author of Biophilic Cities: Integrating Nature into Urban Design and PlanningJennifer Wolch, the editor of Animal Geographies: Place, Politics and Identity in the Nature-Culture Borderlands and author of “Zoöpolis”; and David Gissen the author ofSubnature: Architecture’s Other Environments. The discussion will be moderated by Peter Brastow, San Francisco’s Biodiversity Coordinator for the San Francsico Department of the Environmentand founder of Nature in the City.

The evening will survey small tactical interventions; such as individuals who are transforming their apartment balconies and backyards into wildlife habitats as part of the National Wildlife Federation’s Wildlife Habitat Certification program; to regional sustainability initiatives. We will examine the design of the built environment, from architecture to urban planning and policy, exploring ways to rewild our cities. Finally, we will reflect on how animals and insects have existed in cities historically and how our relationships to them have shifted along with our cultural ideas about nature.

Photo: “Tour of Nests” by Kjellgren Kaminsky Architecture AB is a proposal for a vertical structure accommodates human and animal life within the same building. The project was the winner of the World Architecture Festival in 2011

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Birds-Eye View

Posted by on Apr 11 2013 | events

Birds-Eye View

An evening exploring the unique relationship of birds to our urban environment with Filmmaker Judy Irving in conversation with Megan Prelinger

TIME: 7:00 pm
LOCATION: Studio for Urban Projects, 917 Bryant Street, San Francisco, CA 94103
REGISTRATION: Please RSVP to info@studioforurbanprojects.org
Suggested donation $5-$15
TRANSIT: Served by Market Street transit lines to Civic Center or MUNI lines 19, 27 and 47 to SOMA. On-street bike parking available.

The peregrine falcons nesting on Portland’s Fremont Bridge; the infamous Pale Male, a Red Tail Hawk that has made his home adjacent to Central Park since the early 1990′s; and the wild parrots of San Francisco’s Telegraph Hill are all stories of urban birds that offer us a new perspective on our cities.

Award winning documentary filmmaker Judy Irving has spent the past decade documenting San Francisco’s urban birds. Her acclaimed film, The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill popularized the story of a flock of wild parrots in San Francisco. She is currently working on a new documentary entitled Pelican Dreams which features a young brown pelican who mistakenly landed on the roadway of the Golden Gate Bridge, creating a spectacular traffic jam and re-igniting Judy’s years’-long fascination with these ancient, endangered birds.

Please join us for an evening of film clips and discussion featuring Judy Irving in conversation with Megan Prelinger. Megan Prelinger is co-founder of the Prelinger Library, a public resource for land-use history and urbanism. Megan is a naturalist, member of bird rescue organizations, and a SF Nature Education guide.

 

 

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Mannahatta 2409

Posted by on Dec 20 2012 | events

Mannahatta 2409

A talk by Eric Sanderson on imagining ecological sustainability in the context of climate change

DATE: 
Thursday, December 20th
TIME: 7:00 pm
LOCATION: Studio for Urban Projects, 917 Bryant Street, San Francisco, CA 94103
REGISTRATION: Please RSVP to info@studioforurbanprojects.org
Suggested donation $5-$15
TRANSIT: Served by Market Street transit lines to Civic Center or MUNI lines 19, 27 and 47 to SOMA. Secure bike parking available on-site.

The Mannahatta Project, a project conducted over the last decade by Eric Sanderson, investigated the historical streams, ponds, springs, shores, hills, forests, and wildlife of Manhattan Island on the eve of Henry Hudson’s discovery in 1609. The project allowed New Yorkers to glimpse their ecological past.

Sanderson’s new project, Mannahatta2409.org, enables New Yorkers to imagine their ecological future. With this new web platform, users are able to paint the landscape of Manhattan with new ecosystems, allowing both relatively subtle changes (rain barrels on every block, green roofs on a few buildings) to radical changes in the shape and size and composition of the city’s built and open ecosystems, including buildings, transportation, parks, and natural areas. Each landscape vision can be evaluated in terms of its ecological performance with respect to water, carbon, biodiversity, and population, allowing comparisons for an area as it exists today to an area as it existed four hundred years ago, before European colonization. The goal is to explore the limits of the ecology of densely populated places, to share ideas for ecological success, and to build ecological awareness into the culture of urbanity in New York and elsewhere.

Join us for a talk by Eric Sanderson about his work on Mannahatta 2409. Sanderson is a Senior Conservation Ecologist at the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and the author of the best-selling book,Mannahatta: A Natural History of New York City (Abrams, 2009). The project led to a web map and site (since rebranded welikia.org), an exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York, and the best-selling book. Sanderson is currently pursuing the Welikia Project, on the historical and contemporary ecology of the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island and surrounding waters His next book, Terra Nova: The New World After Oil, Cars, and Suburbs, will be published in 2013.

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Nest Building

Posted by on Dec 16 2012 | events

Nest Building

A workshop in making nests for urban critters with Amber Hasselbring and Lisa Lee Benjamin

Date: Sunday, December 16th
Time:
 1:00-4:00 pm
Location: Studio for Urban Projects, 917 Bryant Street, San Francisco, CA 94103
Registration: $25.00 per person. Please register with EventBrite

San Francisco is one of the densest cities in the country, yet it includes and is adjacent to many natural areas. The city is also a bottleneck in the Pacific Flyway through which migratory birds pass on seasonal migrations. Creating habitat, rest stops and food sources for insects and birds helps to encourage biodiversity in our city and beyond. Please join us for a workshop in creating nests for our urban critters.

Participants will each build a shelter inspired by the nesting habits of insects and birds. Mason bees build nest cavities in existing wood holes. Carpenter bees bore deep into wood to make nests, packed six or seven galleries deep, each provisioned with pollen and an egg. Songbirds use grass, hair, downy seed heads, wool, and lichens for building nests. Spiders use warm, dry cavities filled with sawdust, sand, or grass to make their dens.

The workshop will be taught by artist and naturalist Amber Hasselbring of Nature in the City and the Mission Greenbelt Project in collaboration with designer Lisa Lee Bengamin, of Urban Hedgerow. All materials will be provided and participants will each create a nest to take home. These make wonderful gifts for the holidays! Families are encouraged to attend.


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Exploring Mission Creek

Posted by on Oct 14 2012 | events

Exploring Mission Creek

A walking tour with Chris Carlsson, Leslie Golden, Megan Prelinger, and the Urbia Adventure League

Date: October 14
Time: Urbia Quest 1:00-2:00 pm, Walking Tour 2:00-5:00 pm
Location: Mission Creek Park, meet at the boat launch. 
Directions: The boat launch is on the North side of Mission Creek Park. Look for the blue boat house near the highway 280 overpass. MUNI metro N-Judah, T-Line and bus lines 15, 30, and 45 have stops in the vicinity of Mission Creek Park.
Register: Suggested donation $10.00-20.00
To register please e-mail: info@studioforurbanprojects.org

San Francisco recently launched its new partnership with the Biophilic City Project to become not only a “green” city but one that encourages functioning ecosystems, wildlife, and an abundance of nature. How is the design of our city parks rethinking their role as habitat as well as public green space? How can looking back to the original ecology of our cities inform the ways in which we consider redesigning them?

Join us for a walking tour of Mission Creek. We will explore the natural history of Mission Bay, an estuary once teaming with wildlife as the tides ebbed and flowed over rich mud flats. After years of urban and industrial development that culverted Mission Creek and toxified its waters, dozens of birds and aquatic species have returned to the tidal channel in Mission Creek Park, a remnant of this former watershed. How was the Park designed to create a habitat in the city? What species live here now and can be encouraged to thrive? More broadly, with inspiring examples of daylighting streams, such as the Cheonggyecheon Stream in the heart of Seoul, how can we re-think the ways in which waterways might be integrated into our cities?

Our speakers will include author and historian Chris Carlsson who edited, revised and expanded the book Vanished Waters: A History of San Francisco’s Mission Bay; Leslie Golden of Golden Associates, an award-winning Landscape Architect and Urban Planner who was responsible for the planting design of Mission Creek Park; and Megan Prelinger, co-founder of the Prelinger Library, a public resource for land-use history and urbanism. Megan is a naturalist, member of bird rescue organizations, and a SF Nature Education guide. On hand to add to the discussion will be Amber Hasselbring of Nature in the City, and Ginny Stearns, a Mission Creek houseboat resident and local expert on Mission Creek wildlife.

Early in the day Damien Raffa and Barbara Corff of the Urbia Adventure League  will be piloting their new quest for Mission Creek. Families are welcome to come at 1:00 pm to explore the park and enjoy the latest edition of this great San Francisco self-guided adventure series.

This event is co-presented with Nature in the City.

Listen to Title of audio file

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Reclaim Market Street! Film Screening

Posted by on Nov 15 2011 | events

Reclaim Market Street! Film Screening

 

The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces
Tuesday, November 15, 6:00–8:00 pm
SPUR, 654 Mission Street, San Francisco
This event is free and open to the public.
To register for this event please click here.

Urban planner William H. Whyte’s study The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces is a profound study of urban space. In the 1970s, using methods of direct observation—including photography, film and notation—Whyte and his research assistants compiled a survey of New York’s plazas, streets and sidewalks, examining pedestrian behavior and dynamics. In The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces Whyte presents his witty and insightful views on what makes public space thrive. Please join us for a screening of this seminal film.

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Reclaim Market Street! Street Intervention

Posted by on Oct 22 2011 | events

Reclaim Market Street! Street Intervention

 

Saturday October 22, 1:00- 5:00pm
Meet at Harry Bridges Plaza
Please register with SPUR
This event is free and open to the public
Donations appreciated


“Space is a practiced place.” –Michel de Certeau

Can the street become defined through its patterns of use? Can the increasing numbers of cyclists down Market Street help to enact new ways of thinking about bike lanes, intersections and interactions between people on bikes, on foot, in cars or riding transit? Join us for a ride down Market Street where we will inscribe our route, charting this space for bikes in advance of better bike infrastructure. Bike-share bikes will be available for use on a first-come, first-served basis.
Over the course of our route we will look at the Market Street Bike Lane Trial, discuss plans in progress for future trials and gather ideas for how to design a better Market Street. The day will feature talks with city officials, bicycle advocates, and artists. We will end the day at UN Plaza where we will relax in Rebar’s Bubble Lounge with refreshments powered by their Juicecycle.
Our guests will include Sabrina Merlo, the former Regional Advocacy Director of the Bay Area Bicycle Coalition and co-creator of Civic Cycle; Will Tabajonda of the SFMTA who is helping to launch San Francisco’s bike-share program, Andrew Lee and Nate Chanchareon of the Sustainable Streets Division of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency; Chris Carlsson, author, historian, and co-originator of Critical Mass; Kit Hodge, Director of the San Francisco Great Streets Project; Brian Smith of Huckleberry Bicycles, the newly opened bike repair kiosk on Market Street; and John Bela a collaborator in Rebar.
The street intervention has been created in collaboration with Rebar. We appreciate the participation of ULICU, the San Francisco Bike Coalition and the San Francisco Great Streets Project. Reclaim Market Street! is made possible through the generous support of SPUR and the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency. This event is part of the exhibition Reclaim Market Street! created by the Studio for Urban Projects and exhibited at SPUR. Please visit the exhibition at 654 Mission Street, San Francisco.

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